Social Media

For more than a month, my social media accounts were close to being dead. I can count on one hand the number of posts I had on Facebook and Instagram combined. Prior to going MIA in social media, I was literally an internet addict. I wake up every day checking my notifications and scrolling endlessly through my feed and I lull myself to sleep with my phone in hand with its LCD the only thing illuminating my room.

So I went on a social media diet. Because addiction to anything, may it be vices, and especially social media causes mental health deterioration. I believe that social media contributed to my anxiety and feeling of worthlessness. Looking through the curated feed of friends and strangers whose lives are seemingly perfect surely is a recipe for self-doubt. Few minutes of scrolling that feels negligible actually accumulates into hours that could have been spent to finish a physical book (you know, not an e-book, the one that you can touch and feel), taking out the trash, and pampering yourself.


Do you think you need it too? If you relate to most of the items below, you probably need a social media diet too:

  • You check your mail on your smartphone first thing in the morning.
  • You find it weird when people haven’t heard of IG, Snapchat, or Foursquare.
  • You check your news feed on Facebook, Twitter and other social media more than 5 times a day.
  • You feel stressed if your DMs are not responded to within one hour.
  • You feel a slight feeling of panic when your battery of your smartphone shows less than 10%.
  • You feel depressed/left out/not-living-life-enough seeing others post couple/baby/vacation pics.
  • You engage in lengthy arguments with people who have opposing political views with you/
  • Unfollowed/unfriended real-life friends because of their annoying social media posts.

There are so many benefits in going on a social media diet. I personally experienced:
  • My mood improved.
  • I feel more relaxed. Instead of worrying early in the morning about my notifications, I now start my day slowly easing into wakefulness by consciously becoming mindful. Starting the day with a prayer and other health habits like preparing a breakfast fit for a king jumpstarts my day with positive energy.
  • My brain is less cluttered. Being constantly online exposes us to so much useless information that distracts us from the more important things that we should be focusing on. It's like when you're trying to study, but you are in the middle of a room full of noisy people.
  • I do not feel as anxious as before. I do not have to deal with everything that goes on with the world. Ignorance is bliss, to be honest. I mean, so what if Trump tweets another stupid thing, do I have to participate in the conversation too? Being socially and politically active is good, but, in this present climate, it gets tiring to be in the middle of everything all the time.  
  • I stopped comparing myself to others and feeling like I don't measure up. Not seeing everyone in IG appearing so happy all the time and looking flawless in their selfies helped feel more okay with myself.
  • I became more mindful. I can read for hours without that constant nagging urge to check on my notifs and whether my last post reached a hundred likes.
  • I became more organized. My room is cleaner as I found time putting this away. Thirty minutes of mindlessly scrolling can be spent folding clothes properly.
This social media diet is very timely too. Ramadhan is fast approaching, and I am excited to refresh my faith and heal my soul, In Shaa Allah!